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Elizabeth Davis liz-pic

Assistant Professor 
PhD., UC Irvine, 2009
Office: PSYC 3115
Phone: (951) 827-5236
Email: elizabeth.davis@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

My research focuses on understanding how emotion regulation relates to adaptive outcomes (e.g., learning) and maladaptive outcomes (e.g., anxiety) in childhood. Emotion regulation can be broadly defined as the set of processes by which people influence the timing, expression, and experience of their emotions. Learning to regulate negative emotion is one of the most important tasks of childhood, with far-reaching consequences for children’s school adjustment, peer relationships, and mental health. My work to date has aimed to identify regulatory strategies that children can use to effectively alleviate negative emotion, and to identify individual differences in children’s biology and social experiences that determine whether they can regulate emotion effectively. My work also focuses on identifying mechanisms responsible for effective emotion regulation (e.g., attentional focus) to explain why certain emotion regulation strategies attenuate negative emotion and distress. Ultimately, I view this program of research as providing an empirical basis for interventions aimed at improving children’s emotion regulation abilities and mitigating risk for maladaptive outcomes.

 

Christina Nicolaides christinapic

PhD Candidate
Office: PSYC 2128
Email: cnico002@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I am a fifth year doctoral candidate in the Developmental area of Psychology at UC Riverside. My research focuses on how children’s cognitive and emotion development contribute to their prosocial behavior. I am currently investigating how emotion impacts prosocial behavior towards similar-aged peers in my dissertation study (in progress). My research interests also include contexts within which development occurs, such as parents, and peers, as well as broader social contexts. I received my B.S. in Psychology, with a concentration in Child Psychology, from the University of North Florida and my M.A. from UC Riverside.

 

Parisa Parsafar parisapic

PhD Candidate
Office: PSYC 2128
Email: ppars002@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I am a fourth year graduate student in the Developmental Psychology area at the University of California, Riverside. My work uses eye-tracking, behavioral, and physiological measures to understand cognitive and emotional-regulatory processes related to how people (children and adults) manage negative emotional situations. My current projects include a study examining children’s management of ambiguous threat and another examining how mindful awareness influences cognitive and emotion-related regulatory processes after experiencing negative emotions. I received my B.A. from the University of California, Davis and my M.A. from New York University.

 

Laura Quinones-Camacho Laura_May

PhD Candidate
Office: PSYC 2128
Email: lquin005@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I am a fourth year Ph.D. Candidate in Developmental Psychology at the University of California, Riverside. I received my B.A in Psychology from the University of Puerto Rico in 2013, and an M.A. in Developmental Psychology from the University of California, Riverside in 2015. I am also a recipient of the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship. My research focuses broadly on understanding how regulatory processes (e.g., emotional, physiological, cognitive) develop throughout childhood, and individual differences that can influence the development of these abilities (e.g., environmental risk factors, bilingualism). I am especially interested in understanding how these processes interact to influence the development and maintenance of later psychopathology. I take a multi-method, multi-level approach to understanding these relations using techniques and approaches from cognitive neuroscience, developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, and other fields. My current projects aim to bring together my two main research interests with environmental risk factors and bilingualism into a single model of anxiety development in children.

 

Emily Shih emilypic

PhD Candidate
Office: PSYC 2128
Email: wshih003@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I’m a graduate student in the Developmental Psychology Program at the University of California, Riverside. I graduated with my B.S. in Psychology from University of California, San Diego, where I worked with children and their development of perspective taking across cultures. Then I went on to receive my M.A in Experimental Psychology from California State University, Northridge, studying detection of positive paternal parenting from facial cues across modalities. My research interests are centered around examining the behavioral and physiological effects of parent-child interactions on children’s emotional development. Presently, I am assessing how various parental socialization practices can influence children’s development of psychopathology (e.g. anxiety, aggression), and how children’s physiological profiles might moderate this relation. I am also interested in how the practice of Mindfulness Meditation impacts emotion regulation abilities in adolescence, and am currently working with longitudinal physiological data collected from an annual Mindfulness Meditation Camp.

 

 

Angela Sillars  angelapic

PhD Candidate
Office: PSYC 2128
Email: asill002@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I am a third year graduate student in the Developmental Psychology area at the University of California, Riverside.  My research focuses on understanding the ways in which people’s thoughts influence their emotions.  I am also interested in emotion socialization and how peers, parents and teachers influence children’s emotional competence.  As a developmentalist, my research has focused on how challenge and threat appraisals (i.e., assessments of the resources one has to meet the demands of a situation) and emotion regulation strategies (i.e., the various things people do to change the duration or intensity of their emotions) evolve across childhood and young adulthood.  Another aim of my research is to investigate interventions that address children’s emotional and social development and parents’ and teachers’ understanding of children’s emotions, such as mindfulness programs for youth, restorative justice in schools, and parent support programs.  When I am not working on research I enjoy the great outdoors and taking action to promote climate justice.

 

Sarah Knapp sarah-picture

PhD Student
Office: PSYC 2128
Email: sknap002@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I am a first year graduate student in the Developmental Psychology Program at the University of California, Riverside. My research interests include the effects of positive and negative state and trait emotions on emotion regulation, and in detecting moderating variables that contribute to using emotion regulation strategies effectively to alleviate fear and sadness in youth and adults. I am also interested in the effects of parental anxiety and depression on child shyness, social disinterest, and psychopathology. I received my Master of Arts from Pepperdine University and my Bachelor of Arts from National University. I enjoy traveling to conferences, walking my dogs, and going to stand-up comedy shows.

 

Akhila NekkantiAkhilaNekkanti_photo

 

Research Associate
Office: PSYC 2103
Email: anekk001@ucr.edu
Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

 

I recently graduated from the University of California, Riverside with a B.S. in Neuroscience. As a recipient of the Chancellor’s Research Fellowship, I was able to conduct a longitudinal study exploring the benefits of mindfulness meditation training on adolescents’ stress management. My current interests are centered around examining and improving the efficacy, implementation, and accessibility of present intervention models for youth with psychological problems. Specifically, I am interested in understanding how intervention models can better promote socio-emotional learning and adaptive coping skills.